What We Cannot Choose To Ignore During Michigan State-Notre Dame Week

I almost forgot that this week was "Notre Dame week" for the Michigan State football-minded until my boyfriend commented on his outfit yesterday. He wore St. Patrick's Day socks with shamrocks all over them to match his khakis and Spartan polo because they were green and white, but after sporting that look the past 12 hours, he sighed and asked if I saw anything wrong with his outfit. My response, "Of all weeks to choose to wear those together..." Sorry, Mike!

There is one thing I definitely have not forgotten, though, despite the media seemingly choosing to give it minimal attention: The University of Notre Dame allegedly mishandled and covered up a sexual assault committed by a guy who was a member of its football team at the time.

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5 Reasons Why the League of Legends 2017 World Championships Changes Better Achieve "Competitive Balance"

Last Tuesday, Riot hosted and livestreamed the 2017 Worlds Group Draw Pulls for its monstrously popular video game League of Legends to fill in the tournament bracket and see who will be playing who in China from September 24 to November 4. The League Championship Series (LCS) is comprised of 13 regions - based geographically - so that teams from all regions compete in Worlds across the stages. Here are the LCS regions:

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4 Ways Copyright Law Works with Respect to College Fight Songs

With college football season comes renewed school spirit! Sing that fight song loud and proud through the campus streets or at the stadiums, and hum it all you want, but the law is always at play and explains a lot about why things are the way they are. Here are four ways copyright law interacts with the songs that truly ring clear in the collegiate athletics hype scene.

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A Critical Look at Michigan's Decision to Fully Reinstate WR Grant Perry

It's just about the most wonderful time of the year! I cannot speak for y'all, but I am hyped for this college football season. The media has focused a great deal on nearly finalized rosters, one of which is ranked #17 in the AP preseason poll. For example, it has drawn much attention to the University of Florida's seven football players who are suspended in their season's first game on September 2 against the University of Michigan, including top wide receiver Antonio Callaway, due to their "misuse of school funds" and a handful of players suspended for pot. While those several young men definitively will not be playing, one player will be returning to the lineup on the opposite sideline. On August 11, Michigan announced that it was granting wide receiver Grant Perry full reinstatement to the football team just in time for the Wolverines' game against Florida in Arlington, Texas. The 2017-18 season has yet to really kick off aside from a few games this past weekend, but off-field conduct could already be influencing potential outcomes of individual games and teams' end-game.

Remember hearing about the Michigan Football player who allegedly pulled a Donald Trump-style move in East Lansing on the team's Bye Week? Well, that was Grant Perry. Before diving into the story, I believe it is important to highlight that Perry is the leading receiver for the young Wolverines, having two touchdowns and 27 catches in his first two seasons.

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Game of Amateurs, Season 148, Episode 9: Battle of the OSUs

I know what you are thinking. "Why would I care about anything related to Ohio State?" Ok, my Wolverine ego may be slightly kidding, but in all seriousness, this trademark question is significant because the outcome can affect other universities. For example, what if in addition to the list of registered marks like the Standalone Block M, the University of Michigan attempted to file an application for "U of M" or "UM" to be a federal registered trademark (®) rather than asserting that it is merely a protected trademark that is not registered (™)?

In a world where college athletics is undeniably a business - a BIG business, at that - and where the NCAA itself has trouble justifying its own regulations, laying down the law on who can do what actions (that, FYI, all come down to making money) and where they can or cannot do those actions lawfully will have inevitable consequences. For those of you who have not heard, Ohio State filed an application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for "OSU" to receive federal trademark protection back in February. Specifically, Ohio State wants to register its trademark to protect against unlawful uses on apparel. Each portion of the application information below is meaningful. So, take note, because we will define trademarks, draw out their metes and bounds, speculate on why Ohio State would file an application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and demonstrate how the Battle of the OSUs can impact the business of college athletics.

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On This Day in Sports Law History: August 3, 1949

Not only is it the One True G.O.A.T.'s 40th birthday today (S.O. to Tom Brady - Happy Birthday!) but it is an important day in sports law history.

Happy 68th Birthday, NBA! Here's to another year closer to Space Jam becoming real.

On August 3, 1949, the Basketball Association of American merged with the National Basketball League to create the National Basketball Association. Today, we recognize the NBA as the major men's professional basketball league in North America (not just the United States since the league has been international since conception) and, dare I say it, the premier men's professional basketball league in the world! *GASP* So, let's take a look at the parent leagues which birthed the product bearing the world's highest paid athletes (based on average player salary per player).

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Guest Post - Rex Shield

Since the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit handed down their decision in O’Bannon v. NCAA, the discussions surrounding college athletes’ name, image, and likeness have come to the forefront, and rightfully so. As such, a former University of Central Florida football player, Jah Reid (not to be confused with Jah Rule, of course) sued the university’s athletic department — formally referred to as the UCF Athletics Association (“UCFAA”). His attorney filed a complaint with the Orange County (FL) Circuit Court on May 12. Additionally, Reid named Rise and Conquer LLC (“Rise and Conquer”) as a defendant. Scott Frost, UCF’s Head Football Coach, serves as Rise and Conquer’s de-facto CEO, according to online records.

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Ezekiel Elliott Pulls Down A Woman's Shirt At Dallas St. Patrick's Festivities

Off the field, 2017 is not looking any better on Ezekiel Elliott than 2016 did. While partaking in Dallas' St. Patrick's festivities this past weekend, he reaches over to the woman next to him and pulls down her shirt, exposing her breast. He did not stop there, though. Again, he proceeded to attempt the move for a second time, but she batted his hand away from her.

It is irrelevant whether this woman wanted to show other people her breasts in public, and it is irrelevant whether this woman decided to hang out with him later in the day. What does matter is that Zeke grabbed her shirt and showed her breast to the world and then proceed again in a second attempt, evidently without her consent either time as she quickly pulled up her shirt the first time and slapped his hand away the second time.

Based on the evidence made public thus far, this woman could have a misdemeanor assault or battery claim against Elliott. Each state expresses its own essential elements for what constitutes assault and battery whether it be a misdemeanor or criminal charge, but the general idea is consistent across the board.

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