Posts tagged University of Michigan
4 Ways Copyright Law Works with Respect to College Fight Songs

With college football season comes renewed school spirit! Sing that fight song loud and proud through the campus streets or at the stadiums, and hum it all you want, but the law is always at play and explains a lot about why things are the way they are. Here are four ways copyright law interacts with the songs that truly ring clear in the collegiate athletics hype scene.

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A Critical Look at Michigan's Decision to Fully Reinstate WR Grant Perry

It's just about the most wonderful time of the year! I cannot speak for y'all, but I am hyped for this college football season. The media has focused a great deal on nearly finalized rosters, one of which is ranked #17 in the AP preseason poll. For example, it has drawn much attention to the University of Florida's seven football players who are suspended in their season's first game on September 2 against the University of Michigan, including top wide receiver Antonio Callaway, due to their "misuse of school funds" and a handful of players suspended for pot. While those several young men definitively will not be playing, one player will be returning to the lineup on the opposite sideline. On August 11, Michigan announced that it was granting wide receiver Grant Perry full reinstatement to the football team just in time for the Wolverines' game against Florida in Arlington, Texas. The 2017-18 season has yet to really kick off aside from a few games this past weekend, but off-field conduct could already be influencing potential outcomes of individual games and teams' end-game.

Remember hearing about the Michigan Football player who allegedly pulled a Donald Trump-style move in East Lansing on the team's Bye Week? Well, that was Grant Perry. Before diving into the story, I believe it is important to highlight that Perry is the leading receiver for the young Wolverines, having two touchdowns and 27 catches in his first two seasons.

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Reader Q&A: The Michigan-Nike Sponsorship Contract

The University of Michigan is one of the member institutions in the college athletics groups commonly referred to as the "$100 Million Club," an elite group of schools that generate at least $100,000,000 in annual revenue. A large portion of that revenue comes from athletic sponsorship deals with apparel and equipment suppliers. When the university entered into an athletic sponsorship agreement with adidas that began in 2007, it was not a member of the $100 Million Club. As the contract term progressed, Michigan broke the lofty threshold and continues to do so as its contractual relationship with adidas comes to an end. The deal with adidas was the most lucrative contract at its time, and the deal with Nike was also the most lucrative in college athletics until Nike decided to pay a bit more to the Ohio State Buckeyes.

For me, Michigan's relationship with Nike is a return to all that is good. I grew up wearing my maize and blue Michigan swag with the symbolic swoosh in some visible place. So, when the adidas contract kicked in gear my freshman year, I refused to buy new apparel adidas made with the exception of the annual football t-shirt and, eventually, my NFLPA-licensed #10 Tom Brady jersey. Nike is the big dog in the athletic apparel industry, and it only seemed right that Nike and Michigan, a big dog in college sports, work together.

You asked, and I'll answer. The fun does not stop there, though. This Question and Answer session on this significant contract can show how the sponsorship market has evolved and where changes in the current NCAA "collegiate model" could take place.

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What You Should Know About the Online "Fan-to-Fan" Ticket Marketplace

One of my friends asked me about a story she read involving a Kobe fan who bought tickets on StubHub to the Lakers' last home game of the season before Kobe announced his retirement. (Thank you, Angelic!) After the fan bought the tickets, the seller claimed to have typed the price incorrectly after Kobe announced his retirement and the price for comparable tickets skyrocketed. The seller canceled, relisted, and resold those same tickets. In the end, StubHub tried to find comparable tickets but came up short for the Kobe fan, and the Kobe fan was furious at how a giant like StubHub could play a role in such an injustice so nonchalantly.

The fan and the writer who posted the fan's story believe this is not right, though they use other words to get their point across. My friend asked me, "Is this legal?" My answer is a little long because the online secondary ticket market is full of complications, but the short answer is "Yes, this is legal from the online secondary ticket platform's stance."

With the convenience of this market comes risks for both buyers and sellers. Here are a few points y'all should be aware of to better understand how this market operates, what kind of role it plays in the sports industry, and why it is legal - however unfair it seems on the surface - for StubHub to handle the Kobe fan's situation the way it did.

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Ohio State & Others React to O'Bannon Pressures by Limiting Jersey Sales

If - heaven forbid - you desire to purchase an Ohio State University football jersey this season, your options will be limited. Very limited. By "limited," I honestly mean you will only be able to buy either #1 or #15. OSU told Nike to only produce jerseys with these two numbers, and retailers can only sell jerseys with these two numbers.

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